Hot Metal Bridge

Current Issue : Number Twenty-Five

Contributors’ Notes

BY HMB

tiny maple

Lee Capps (Gas Station Rose) grew up in Black Mountain, North Carolina and now lives with his wife and two young sons near Richmond, Virginia. In 2002 he won the Graduate Fiction Fellowship of the College of Humanities and Sciences at Virginia Commonwealth University. Recently his short fiction has appeared in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. He is at work on a novel about family, belief, and outsider art.

tiny maple

Alan DeNiro (XV: Station of Imaginary Civilians). Alan DeNiro’s poetry has appeared in Spoon River Poetry Review, Bird Dog, and elsewhere. He is the author of two poetry chapbooks, The Black Hare and Atari Ecologues. His short story collection, Skinny Dipping in the Lake of the Dead, appeared from Small Beer Press in 2006.

tiny maple

Molly Fuller (Home) is currently an MFA candidate in creative writing at Sarah Lawrence College. She earned her MA in English from Ohio University. This is her first publication. At the moment she is working on a novel.

tiny maple

Maurice Guevara (The Sound of Glass is Unmistakable) Born in Belencito, Colombia, Maurice Kilwein Guevara was raised in the Pittsburgh area and currently lives in Milwaukee. These poems come from a collection-in-progress entitled POEMA.

tiny maple

Janis Butler Holm (Three Riffs) lives in Athens, Ohio, where she served as Associate Editor for Wide Angle, the film journal. Her essays, stories, poems, and performance pieces have appeared in small-press, national, and international magazines.

tiny maple

Bryan Hurt (Rose) is currently a PhD candidate in Literature & Creative Writing at the University of Southern California where he is co-founder of The Loudest Voice, a poetry and fiction reading series. This is his first publication.

tiny maple

Sue Jostrom (Growing Carrots). Sue graduated in June ’06 with an MFA in creative nonfiction at Antioch University, Los Angeles. Currently, she lives in Whitefish, MT and Atlanta, GA and writes for local, obscure publications. She has completed a memoir, “Scrambled Heart” (not yet published) and is working on her first novel.

tiny maple

RoseMarie London (Don’t Make So Much of It). Born and raised in New York City, RoseMarie lives in Wyoming where the whiskey’s cheap.

tiny maple

Michael Martone (Leap Day) was born in Fort Wayne, Indiana. When living in Baltimore, years ago, he would take the Broadway Limited back home, riding in a roomette that had a folding sink and a folding bed and a little closet where he kept his shoes and the next morning he would find them, the shoes, shined by the night car attendant. The train would stop in Pittsburgh late at night. In the darkness, Martone could see the bridges of Pittsburgh making lacey darker shadows in the near distance. He thought it strange how everyone then thought wooden covered bridges were so lovely and worth saving while at the same time disliked the steel truss bridges like the ones in Pittburgh that replaced them. Martone, in the dead of night, in the Pittsburgh train station, knew one day that the ugly metal bridges of Pittsburgh, of America, would be thought worth saving, would be thought of as lovely as wood. Once, that is, they too began to be replaced by the newer concrete ones.

tiny maple

Sally Pfoutz (Autumn Collage) writes essays and artist profiles for élan magazine. She is the author of two novels, Missing Person and Red-tail. Her poetry has appeared in Phoebe and Fugue. She has had articles in The Washington Post and Country Magazine. Her short story, “If You Were a Tiger” won the 2001 Alice Abel National Literary Award. Her short story, “Anemone,” is included in the anthology Grace & Gravity. She lives on a farm in Virginia.

tiny maple

Simone Poirier-Bures (Good Snake, Bad Snake) is the author of Candyman, a novel set in her native Nova Scotia; That Shining Place, an award-winning memoir of Crete; and Nicole, short narratives about growing up female and Acadian. Her work has been included in numerous anthologies and journals in the United States, Canada, Australia, and England. She is currently making handmade books of “nature narratives.”

tiny maple

Poems by Lynne Potts (Idaho) have appeared in Paris Review, Southern Humanities Review, Oxford Magazine, Cumberland Review, Art Times, River Oak Review, Green Hills Literary Review, Drumvoices, and many other journals. She has an MFA from Columbia University and was Poetry Editor of the Columbia Journal of Literature and Art. She has read at Poets House, Columbia University Gallery, Ear Shot, and Cornelia Street Cafe and was recently a featured poet on WKCR, New York. She was a reader for the 2006 Ludington Poetry Festival in Ludington, MI and was awarded a place at Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference for August 2006.

tiny maple

Abby Sinnott (The Wall) resides in a 127-year-old San Francisco apartment inhabited by Marilyn Monroe’s gentle ghost. She earned her MFA in creative writing at San Francisco State University. Previous work has appeared online at Salon.com and Stirring: A Literary Collection, as well as in the pages of Transfer magazine and In Search of Adventure anthology. Currently, she is at work on a novel.

tiny maple

Morelle Smith (Mirror City). Morelle Smith’s writing has appeared in various magazines and anthologies in the UK, France, and Canada, including Chapman, Modern Scottish Women Poets, La Traductiere, DublinQuarterly.com, Stigmes and Textualities.net. She has three poetry collections published, most recently The Way Words Travel; short stories, “Streets of Tirana” and “Almost Spring”; and two novellas, Touching the Shell and Editions Arabesques. Her work has been exhibited on transport systems and translated into French and Albanian. She’s based in the UK, where she teaches English, French, and creative writing, and she travels as much as possible.

tiny maple

Johnathan Wilber ((de)jamais vu) is a graduate student in Columbia University’s creative writing program for fiction. He is author of an unpublished collection of short stories entitled “Bugchasing” and is currently working on his first novel.